30 June 2016

Financial Peace of Mind

It is with much relief that I have now returned to this side of planet Earth from my recent excursion to the UK.



True servants of peace and enlightenment often wish to enhance global prosperity in an equitable way.  They are known to seek out insights into the consistent causes of poverty and wealth, wherever those insights are to be found.

Poverty has so far been mentioned only on four previous occasions in this salon:

1. In relation to the Enlightened Nations

2. In relation to preventing military pollution

3. In relation to overcoming egocentrism

4. In relation to transcending conflict justifiably and resolving it through peaceful arts


Wealth has been mentioned only on five previous occasions here:

1. In relation to expressing peace through good reasoning

2. Seventy years after another war ended

3. With Mozart as a peace system

4. In relation to the question: Can real art save the world?

5. In relation to poverty, injustice and the necessity to overcome egocentrism in the name of world peace


In itself, there is nothing wrong with wealth.  It is only a cause of conflict when abusiveness is prevalent in its acquisition, use and destruction.

Relative poverty itself is not wrong if it has been deliberately chosen by its participants as a way to live life more carefully, simply and healthily.

Absolute poverty is always wrong if it is deliberately chosen by those experiencing it.  Those individuals are obviously attention-seeking nincompoops, willing to make a nuisance of themselves at the expense of other, more reasonable individuals.

At the other extreme, when people have more than enough wealth, their lives often become more complicated than would otherwise be the case.  Their obligations to society become greater.  Their duties towards persons in poverty become more substantial.

But what does it mean to have more than enough wealth?

To have financial peace of mind is to be aware, and appreciative, of the availability of adequate financial resources for future potential necessities.  Yet there is no financial stability in the world.  There are overly powerful, selfish gamblers preventing that stability from occurring.

On this day four years ago, I had a private conversation with a few of my salon guests regarding money and the real world economy.  A record of that conversation was secretively written down by one of the servants of enlightenment, behind the screen.

In a condensed form, a summary of the conversation found its way into a notebook in the service wing.  This was brought to my attention quickly by one of the servants of honesty.

I do not mind if any of my servants wish to become more enlightened.  Indeed, I commend their initiative in that regard.  My main concern is that they may form inaccurate opinions without suitable guidance, hence I have always required everyone to gain my permission before interpreting my words in the wider world.

What are your own opinions on money and the real world economy?

And what do you usually do with your surplus wealth?